Flushed with Love Review

Borrowing from the golden age of radio and over-the-top cigarette ads, Flushed With Love is a fresh and comical take on the 1930’s gangster adventure drama, full of action, love, and fish guts.

Instead of an excruciatingly detailed plot, it decides to shot itself with a machine gun and bandage it’s holes with priceless zaniness. It is straightforward and easy to understand, but the narrative is far from uninteresting. The tale of a fishmonger and his wife getting involved in the mafia is a brilliant idea and one full of opportunities to tell jokes. One cannot take this overly seriously.

The voice actors are great in their roles and add a lot of personality. Their characters are wacky, insane people living in a Great Depression era and they pull them off admirably. The original musical score is astounding and captures the vibe of 30s jazz. The sound design in general is amazingly detailed and precise, which compliments it’s audacious tone. However, what really sells the show is it’s advertisements, which are some of the funniest I’ve ever heard.

This show holds itself to a very high standard of comedy. At times, however, the comedy can seem a little reference-heavy and rather than engross the audience into its setting, it just reminds the audience of other media. It blatantly breaks the fourth wall several times, which can be a little jarring. Some people might not mind some of the very obvious references, so in that case, you might find this funny all the way through. The simplest way to describe the humor is that when it hits, it hits hard. But when it doesn’t hit about 5% of the time, it’s almost painfully noticed.

Overall, Flushed With Love is a great radio show that feels and sounds straight out of a Three Stooges episode. It’s impeccable comedic timing, hilarious references, superb voice acting, and spectacular sound design makes this a must-see if you have any appreciation for compelling storytelling.

4.75/5 Stars

Jack Flanders: Dreams of Rio, Week One

Author Picture

Part of Tom Lopez's "Jack Flanders" series, Dreams of Rio has heavy emphasis on the setting, rather than the actors. Judging by how quiet some of their lines are and how overpowering the background sounds are, it seems Mr. Lopez was going for something a bit different than the standard character-based audio dramas.


That combined with what seems like random, but authentic noises, recorded from actual places in Latin America makes the first half of this production feel almost too real. A classic case of truth being stranger than fiction. Fun fact, Mr. Lopez travelled to Rio de Janeiro & the Amazon to record the soundscape for this particular story.


Not only is Mr. Lopez raising the bar for ambience in audio dramas by essentially location scouting (The Cleansed comes to mind as well), he is also a bit of an entrepreneur. While some people may find issues with how he distributes his shows, the Jack Flanders series, as well as hundreds of other audio entertainment can be streamed for a small monthly fee. Rather than going the direct download route, Mr. Lopez is providing a Netflix-type service for his art. Something which some creatives tend to shy away from as it feels too corporate or


Mr. Lopez's company "ZBS Media" has over 238 hours of audio entertainment. Those not interested in paying the monthly streaming fee can get this and other shows for a one-time cost of around $25, depending on the show. The site is zbs.org (download) and can also be found on zbsmedia.com (streamed).


After listening to the first episode, the desire to hear how the story unfolds is almost pathological. Luckily ZBS Media has a 7 day free trial period where you can listen to all of his audio dramas. Something, which is recommended after you hear the ending of the first episode.

Michael L. Bergonzi   

Press Release: The Good Listener

THE GOOD LISTENER

A new 3 part radio drama from Holy Mountain is a highly authentic portrayal of life inside GCHQ.

BBC Radio 4

Monday 31st October at 1415

Tuesday 1st November at 1415

Wednesday 2nd November at 1415

 

Listen to the trailer:

www.holymountain.co.uk

 

The Good Listener is the result of a long and detailed research process undertaken by its creators, writer Fin Kennedy and director Boz Temple-Morris, into the doings of GCHQ, the spy agency responsible for cyber security and digital operations. This is the third outing for the production after one-off radio dramas in 2014 and 2015. During this time Fin and Boz have consulted professionals and experts from all sides, even gaining access to GCHQ itself. Their enquiry has been wide ranging, looking at day to day life inside the ‘doughnut’ as well as the operations themselves and the political context.

 

This story begins a reluctant Henry Morcombe and his team are preparing to listen in to the G20 conference of world leaders. A cyber-attack is detected that targets the electricity network across London – not unusual in itself, but this one is remarkable in its complexity and resilience. Clearly a major attack is about to unfold. This could be a terrorist act, a criminal one or even an attack sponsored by a nation state. The team need to find the source and neutralise the threat before blackouts bring chaos and major casualties.

 

Cyber-crime targeting critical infrastructure remains an issue of serious concern to guardians of national security around the world. Highly secretive projects exist not only to defend against such attacks but also to use them offensively against nation state targets.

 

Owen Teale (Game of Thrones, and currently appearing with Ian McKellen and Patrick Stewart in No Mans Land) stars as Henry Morcombe, an old school GCHQ agent who is fighting from within to keep the agency from becoming like their USA counterparts, NSA, whom he considers to be data-hungry and militaristic.

 

Holy Mountain are known for innovative productions that are rich in sound and also for tackling serious issues with rigour and balance. See below.

 

Director and Producer Boz Temple-Morris;

“We’re telling a really good story about normal people trying to do an abnormal job. The work of GCHQ is so central to the way we live today – and vital to our national security – and yet so little little is known about what they do and how they do it. Should we be more grateful for the protection they offer us or more angry at the liberties they take with our privacy? Maybe both? The Good Listener takes the audience inside the doughnut but lets them judge what’s happening for themselves.”

 

The Good Listener is created by Fin Kennedy and Boz Temple-Morris and also features the work of Hassan Abdulrazzak (writer, part 2) and Anders Lustgarten (writer, part 3).

 

Return Home (Episodes 1.1-7.3)

Return Home is simply an experience. Very few podcasts I’ve listened to in my long history of reviewing audio dramas (a whole three months!) have elicited such an emotional response. This is storytelling at its absolute finest.

The simple, yet charming adventures of Jonathan Barker, Amy Reynolds, and Buddy Nutters in the decrescent, strange town of Melancholy Falls is mesmerizing. It’s truly a testament to say that were-bunnies is not the strangest thing they encounter.

As Rod Serling would tell you, iconic music is important if you want to grab the audience’s attention and draw them closer to the screen. Or…iPod. The music is top-notch, blending a spine-chilling cola with a loud pianoforte smoothie to create an instrumental that embodies the weirdness of Melancholy Falls. As for the background effects, it is hyper-realistic. It can make one feel like they are right next to a creepy ghoul or Buddy’s toe-jam.

There’s a reason why Return Home has been nominated in 16 different categories at the Audio Verse Awards. Everyone who has worked on the podcast is extremely passionate about their work, which shows with its flawless execution.

Return Home achieves something that audiences are not accustomed to: perfection. It’s one of those rare instances where if this was made to be a movie, it would pale in comparison to the audio version. There is absolutely nothing wrong with Return Home with it’s original story, inspiring and believable characters, it’s superb sound design, and the allure of wanting more.   

You cannot just listen to one episode and stop. It’s as if there was something in the frequency that will make you come back for more…

As Jonathan Barker would tell you, “Let’s go find the weird!”

5.5/5

The Killing Joke Review (Yes, again)

The Killing Joke Graphic Novel Cover

Preamble

To Batman fans, “The Killing Joke” is one of the most quintessential comics in recent years. Comic book readers tend to agree: The Killing Joke is Joker’s true origin story. Last time you heard Zane’s thoughts on one particular Killing Joke adaptation found on YouTube. This week’s review is the same story, but with a different cast and crew  behind it. Whether it be adaptations or reviewing the same exact audio stories, I’d like to do more of this in the future. Call it a spin on the saying: “Different Strokes for Different Folks.” With that said, let’s get down to the review.

“The Killing Joke” Review

The only way to mess up an audio adaptation is with over-the-top acting and bad sound effects. When you’re adaptating a story from a comic book, people tend to gloss over sound effects and go straight for the acting itself. In this particular adaptation, every line of dialogue comes straight from the comic. Like the last “The Killing Joke” review (written by Zane Sexton), this one is also on YouTube. As the title of this one will say, it’s a motion comic and audio dramatization. While the visuals aren’t required, it might’ve helped with the performances.

Not to say they were bad, but they were no Mark Hamill or Kevin Conroy, which they seemed to be trying to emulate in their performances. The actors playing Joker and Batman/Bruce Wayne were over the top is some instances and melodramatic in others. It was hit or miss, more often than not, and a struggle to get through the entire story. The first 10-15 minutes were the most awkward, as if the actors were finding their way into character.

That said, it’s hard to live up to the graphic novel’s acclaim. Even the animated movie failed to capture the story, according to most critics. The general consensus was the off-putting scene in the “prologue” with Batgirl that wasn’t in the original story. Unlike the animated movie, this audio adaptation is faithful to the source material and it’s perhaps its greatest flaw.

If you’ve never read The Killing Joke or know nothing about it, you might enjoy this. Aside from those two reasons, you’re better off listening to the one Zane Sexton reviewed on the site or reading the graphic novel.

It’s as simple as this: if you know what’s going to happen in a story, then the only thing that can make it engaging comes through with the production itself. As far as this adaptation goes, it barely scrapes by.

3.5/5 Stars

The Killing Joke Review

A new twist on one of Batman’s most famous tales, The Killing Joke is an audio drama made by WMSC 90.3 FM. It’s well-crafted, with strong characters, and production quality making it a must-hear experience.

The story mainly focuses on The Joker and how he became a super villain, sometimes interjecting Batman’s investigation into Joker’s crimes. The radio drama switches from past to present and back again, which might make it a little confusing at certain times, but it’s a minor nitpick. The supporting characters, such as Alfred, provides interesting commentary into the Batman mythos, but overall has little impact on the plot. Despite the minor problems, the story is very dark and extremely well constructed.

The voice acting is superb. The voice actor for The Joker engulfs himself in the character, creating a man who’s been driven insane by death, misfortune, and rational, yet poor decisions. Joker absolutely loves being in his inner-asylum.

The production quality is very good, with no technical problems. The background noises for the various settings complete the mood and atmosphere, whether you’re at a deranged carnival to a basement filled with horrors.

But the best aspect of this radio drama is the dialogue. The voice actors steal the show with their believability and the conversations between Batman and the Joker are both interesting and disturbing. It can make one believe that good and evil are really not so different after all, that our own perception on ourselves is the only barrier between heinous acts and good deeds.

This version of the classic Batman vs. Joker story is one that should be experienced by any fan of the dark-winged hero.

5/5 Stars

Listen Here

Cast

Kevin O’Leary as Batman
Brendan Maly as The Joker
Rob Dickerson as James Gordon
Morgan Vasquez as Jack’s Wife
Jeremy Doyle as Pseudo Joker/ Hood 1
Michael Sangregorio as Det. Bullock/ Hood 2/ Cop
Antoinette Fasino as Barbara Gordon
Mike Bufis as Carnival Freak

Site Updates

New interview posted on Audio Drama Digest. A YouTube-based company/troupe.

Next Review will be another version of The Killing Joke. This time another adaptation of the classic Joker origin story.

Interview: Fault Line Players, Youtube and OTR Serial Homages

With the vast majority of audio dramas being on iTunes and other Podcasting applications, why YouTube? Are there any plans to publish on other platforms?

Ted Falagan – YouTube was simply the most accessible and, most importantly for a troupe that produces everything out of their own pockets, it didn’t cost anything.  We’re also on SoundCloud (where folks can download free MP3’s of our latest works.).  We’ve tried ITunes, Pod-O-Matic, Podbean, and even our own website, but found that YouTube simply reaches the most people and requires the least amount of effort on our part in terms of marketing.  Don’t get me wrong, we do as much social media marketing as humanly possible, it’s just that YT is easy to format and has a bigger reach. Our website is down for the time being, but we plan on re-launching it soon.  But it’s a lot of work to maintain.  Currently, FLP has a staff of two – myself and my wife, Debbie – and we do all of the writing, editing, the majority of the voice acting, and all of the marketing, so we have to try and keep things simple.  Or we collapse!

Talking about the Silver Fox, what made you want to tackle such a classic archetype of radio drama, which some would say has been overdone. Were you going for an homage or something different?

T.F. – I’ve always been a comic book fan and wanted to try a super hero tale.  It seems that the mysterious, lone vigilante hero – armed with only his fists and guns (ala The Green Hornet, Shadow, etc.) is the easiest to translate into an audio format.  ‘The Silver Fox’ is definitely an homage to that form of storytelling.  I suppose it is overdone to a certain extent.  I simply wanted to create a world where this character could exist in and then co-exist and interact with other heroes (many of which will be introduced in future ‘S.F.’ episodes.)  I loved comics specifically for the connectivity of the stories, the characters all existed in the same universe.  Now that Marvel has finally taken the step into translating that to a film universe, I wanted to try and do it with an audio one.  A lot of future threads in my ‘S.F.’ stories will connect in small ways to some of my other audio stories.  And, for those brave souls who follow our works, perhaps they’ll notice and be excited by it. Or not.

Do you record the actors at the same time in the same room, or is this an online endeavor? If you had the chance to do it the other way, would you?

Deborah Fabiano-Falagan – We record everything in a little office / studio in our apartment.  When using outside actors, we have them come in one at a time (there isn’t room for multiple actors) and then they record their lines in one session.  We’ve had actors record lines on their own, using various recording methods, and actually from spots all over the world, but it began to get problematic getting the different recordings from varied sources to sound right, so we discarded that approach.  We have moved recently and now have a bigger space, so we hope to get a troupe together and record some works live in the future.

What are some of your personal favorite productions you’ve done so far. Are there any in upcoming projects you’d like to share?

D.F.F. – My favorite episodes to write are the ‘Asylum of The Mind’ episodes.  That’s our horror anthology series.  Since it’s an anthology, I get to really stretch my imagination and go very dark.  As far as the future goes, we are currently auditioning for new troupe member so we can get more voices into the mix and, hopefully, to get some more writers.  Ted & I can write and act in many shorts, that’s fine, but having more voices both behind and in front of the mic would be the ideal situation.  And that’s what we hope to do.  Right now, we premiere a new short once a month, but we’d love to get enough new talent added so that we can, perhaps, move to a weekly – or at least bi-weekly – schedule as far as content output goes.  That would be ideal.  We always have ideas and new scripts, and will keep creating works of all genres.  We have a 1950’s era, sci-fi series coming called ‘The Aquarians,’ and a continuation of our popular vampire web-series ‘brood,’ called ‘The House of Kaine.’

 

Michael: Thanks to Deborah and Ted for taking the time to answer these questions. A review of The Silver Fox will premiere over at Audio Drama Reviews on December 4th, 2016.

Kakos Industries Episodes 1-5 Review

A fictional broadcast for a made-up corporation, Kakos Industries is the evil love child of The Bright Sessions and King Falls AM and that’s not because it’s structure and style match those two titans of newer audio dramas.

Kakos Industries easy-to-follow format is one of its hallmarks. On average, there is only one character. That of Corin Deeth III, voiced by creator, Conrad Miszuk. The show’s format is focused on corporate announcements about Kakos Industries and its operations in the world. There’s a lot of dry wit humor and dark comedy sprinkled throughout, adding a Pratchett-esque feel to the episodes as a whole.

Continuity between episodes is easily forgotten if you’re not listening back to back and is quite subtle. Most of them take the form of running gags like Kakos Industries shareholders being the only ones who are able to listen to the announcements. Anyone else should end their lives in a black comedy kind of way. Obviously, this is not for the faint of heart and contains explicit language such as the occasional f-bomb and humor that makes you “that’s just wrong” throughout. Personally, I love it. If I ever get more free time, this goes on my list.

Each episode is more or less standalone and releases each month along with the full text on their website.

5/5 Stars

Press Release: Radio Drama Creator Tom Lopez Launches New Audio Drama Streaming Website

Influential radio dramatist Tom Lopez has launched a new website for lovers of audio drama.  The website allows subscribers to stream a total of 238 hours of radio drama for a small monthly or annual fee.  

Lopez has been producing radio/audio stories for 46 years – comic and cosmic adventures, science fiction, mystical mysteries, some with spiritual wisdoms, and some that are just down right fun, family entertainment.  His intention has always been to raise consciousness by using the media, radio and audio.

The dramas include performances by a stable of talented actors from the worlds of Broadway, television and avant-garde theater; original music by composer Tim Clark; and real-world ambient sound Lopez has recorded around the globe.

Lopez’s non-profit foundation ZBS produced original stories for Public Radio, Internet Radio, CDs, and MP3 downloads. When radio drama peaked in the 1980’s many of his series aired on the BBC, CBC Canada, ABC Australia, National Public Radio & Armed Forces Radio, including over 500 stations in the US.  As radio drama began to disappear from the airwaves, Lopez sought out alternative avenues of distribution that were consistent with his adventurous nature including podcasting.

Over the years Lopez has kept ZBS alive with government grants and commissions for audio books. Fans have played a critical role by donating money and buying his finished radio dramas online.

“People actually give us money to continue to produce,” Lopez says. “These are all public radio listeners. They understand that you have to support not-for-profit arts organizations.”

Fans of radio drama can check out Lopez’s catalogue and find out more information at www.zbsmedia.com.

 

Jazz Beitler

Caalo Xan Season One

Caalo Xan is as science fiction as one can get, having a hound as the leading character, a team of swashbucklers travelling through the Galaxy, and meeting a weird and alien cast of friends and foes along the way.

Multiple things about the audio drama can hook the audience. It has an excellent original song playing at the beginning and end of every episode, which can draw anyone into the atmosphere and tone, very much like how an audio drama should. Another excellent thing are the sound designs. Actions scenes are given a boost on life due to the laser sound effects, the soft, creeping footsteps of enemies, and the speed of the spaceships. The characterization is extremely well done, as the dialogue flows naturally and their topics of discussion really humanize them into something more than a ragteam of misfits.

However, there are some technical problems with the audio drama that might make it hard for people to listen to. First, some of the voice acting could’ve been better, as they are often monotone or just feel like an actor reading off a script. There is little believability when it happens.  Another problem I noticed was the inconsistent volume levels, ranging from extremely low to intolerably high. As such, immersion is almost immediately broken when this occurs.

It’s shocking to learn that over forty people have given their voices for this project, so it’s obviously a collaborated effort to mimic the 1940’s radio drama style, which succeeds splendidly. While science fiction isn’t my favorite genre, the compelling stories and memorable cast of characters overshadows the technical problems the show has.

3.5/5 Stars