Awesome Foley: Deck the Halls (with Matrimony!)

Foley

Give this Foley Artist ALL the Awards

Without a doubt, this is one of the best sounding free podcast audio dramas out there. The foley work alone is deserving of every award out there. Right from the start, the foley artist uses everything and the kitchen sink to create an image of chaotic harmony in the opening scene. As for the actors and actresses, their voices are distinct from one another and you understand everyone’s role in the story early on. The writers throw you in the deep end with a wedding preparation scene involving turkeys, played by actual gobbling people. And, like the foley, it doesn’t come across as sounding fake, forced or unintentionally comedic.

A romantic comedy may be a staple of Hollywood, but in an audio drama the idea of a miscommunication affecting a relationship feels more like bad storytelling. Deck the Halls is the answer to that common complaint. Even if it falls back on the same tropes by the end. That being said, this hour long production treats it more like a plot twist than a face palming joke, giving it more of an emotional punch than most romantic comedies. The feeling might not be expected from a romantic comedy, but it’s what separates it from so many others. No, nobody dies.

Story < Foley

As far as story goes, there’s nothing new here in the realm of a romance, comedy or romantic comedy. The plot is the simple “boy meets girl, boy loses girl. Boy gets girl back” cliche we’ve seen a million times. The one difference is there’s a female in the lead role instead of the usual male protagonist. However, in today’s society, it doesn’t hold the same weight in regards to a trope subversion.

5/5 Stars

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Next Time

Liberty: Critical Research (Season One)

Review of Companions: A Sci-Fi Romance

Artwork for Companions

It’s not quite a romance in space, but writer Bob Koester know how to elicit the same emotions as a Harlequin novel. Interpret that however you want, but personally the milieu of Companions convoluted the romance arc, leaving it watered down and by no means easy to follow.

The story’s setting is hands-down hard science fiction, while the primary drive comes from the two love interests. The main problem with the characters is how they interact and that has nothing to do with the actor’s performances. Koester complicates their method of communication by adding a layer of confusion to an already loaded script, filled with a lot of exposition that doesn’t add much substance. They talk through a virtual simulation and the dialogue during those scenes will make you re-listen at least once, because you don’t know who’s talking: the online avatar or the person controlling it?

One thing which stood out was the non-linear structure of the story that’s combined rather elegantly with a classic victorian-esque frame narrative, though obviously set in the future. In addition to the frame, the story also skips around the lives of the protagonist, dodging the “boring” bits through obvious author sleight of hand.

Whether it’s a romance masquerading as hard science fiction or hard SF pretending to be a romance, Companions is worth a listen or two. Just don’t expect to understand everything even a second time through.

4/5 Stars

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Interview with Companions’ Writer/Director

In a recent interview with Audio Drama Reviews sister site “Audio Drama Digest,” creator Bob Koester sat down with us to explain the behind the scenes of the story. You can find that here.